Dearborn Music

Michigan Roots

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Through stories and recipes nearly lost to time, author Paul Vachon explores the history of the Motor City's fine dining, ethnic eateries and everything in between. Grab a cup of coffee - he's got stories to share. While some restaurants come and go with little fanfare, others are dearly missed and never forgotten. In 1962, patrons of the Caucus Club were among the first to hear the voice of an eighteen-year-old Barbra Streisand. Before Stouffer's launched a frozen food empire, it was better known for its restaurants with two popular locations in Detroit. The Machus Red Fox was the last place former Teamsters president Jimmy Hoffa was seen alive.
Michigan Roots	 - Lost Restaurants of Detroit
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First held in 1849 in Detroit, the location of the Michigan State Fair rotated in the early years between Detroit, Ann Arbor, Kalamazoo, Adrian, Jackson, Grand Rapids, East Saginaw, Lansing, and Pontiac before settling permanently in Detroit. When Detroit department store magnate Joseph L. Hudson sold 135 acres of Woodward Avenue farmland to the Michigan State Agricultural Society in 1905 for $1, the permanent home of the Michigan State Fair was established. On February 12, 2009, Michigan governor Jennifer Granholm signed an executive order effectively ending a 160-year tradition--the Michigan State Fair.

Michigan Roots	 - Michigan State Fair
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When President Roosevelt called for the country to be the great "Arsenal of Democracy," Detroit helped turn the tide against fascism with its industrial might. Locals were committed to the cause, putting careers and personal ambitions on hold. Factories were retooled from the ground up. Industrialist Henry Ford, First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, aviator Charles Lindbergh, legendary boxer Joe Louis, future baseball Hall of Famer Hank Greenberg and the real-life Rosie the Riveters all helped drive the city that was "forging thunderbolts" for the front lines. With a panoramic narrative, author Gregory D. Sumner chronicles the wartime sacrifices, contributions and everyday life of the Motor City.
Michigan Roots	 - Detroit in World War II
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Also known as the Old Red Barn, Olympia Stadium was the largest rink in the United States when it opened in Detroit on October 22,1927. Robert Wimmer has compiled over 200 historic photographs and detailed captions for this new book, that follows the life of a sporting and entertainment landmark in the Motor City until its demolition in 1986. For over half a century, the Olympia Stadium hosted many of the top shows and stars coming through Detroit. The historic landmark filled its seats for the multitude of sporting events in Michigan, including championship boxing, wrestling, and lacrosse, and was also the home of the Detroit Redwings and the Pistons. Although there are many anonymous people pictured here who contributed to the history of the stadium, readers will recognize the more familiar faces and acts of Elvis Presley, the Beatles, the Roy Rogers Rodeo, Dick the Bruiser, and many others.
Michigan Roots - Detroit's Olympia Stadium
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In 1913, the Michigan Central Station opened its majestic entrances to the people of Detroit. Designed by Warren & Wetmore and Reed & Stern, the firms also noted as the architects of the Grand Central Station in New York City, the depot was a marvel of grandeur and comfort for the traveler lucky enough to utilize its facilities. Soldiers went to war, families both separated and rejoined, and folks looking for an honest living in the Motor City all walked the Michigan Central's elegant corridors. Since the last train pulled away from the station in 1988, the structure has fallen prey to rapidly paced deterioration. Detroit's Michigan Central Station captures the glory of the Michigan Central and its environs. Using photographs from the Burton Historical Collection, as well as private collections, the book illustrates the use of the Michigan Central Station by a city whose story dramatically parallels that of this magnificent structure. The book also includes imagined futures of the station from some of the many people who have been inspired by the magic this grand building continues to exude.
Michigan Roots - Detroit's Michigan Central Station
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Detroit's Street Railways tells the story of public transportation in the Motor City. Dating back to 1863, when horse-drawn streetcars serviced the citizenry, public transportation in Detroit has a proud and colorful history. Early on, a host of streetcar companies carried Detroiters about their daily business. This period was followed by consolidation into one company, the Detroit United Railway, and later the establishment of the municipally owned Department of Street Railways. The Department of Street Railways, established May 15, 1922, inherited a vast system of streetcar lines throughout Detroit, the first city in the United States to establish municipally owned transit system. It was a leader and innovator in the transit industry, with continued streetcar service until April 8, 1956, when the last streetcars on Woodward Avenue were replaced by buses. When the Department of Street Railways began coach operations in 1925, the intent was to provide feeder service to the established streetcar lines, as expansion costs were prohibitive. Sadly, the program implemented to complement the city's streetcar operations led to the demise of the streetcar as the principal mode of transportation in the Motor City.
Michigan Roots - Detroit's Street Railways
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Vernor's Ginger Ale has sparkling fizz, a unique taste, and a history that goes back before Coca-Cola, Pepsi, Hires, or Moxie. At over 140 years old, Vernor's is America's oldest continuously produced soft drink. Upon returning from the Civil War in 1866, James Vernor opened a pharmacy in Detroit. He also opened a barrel of ginger ale extract he had created before the war. He discovered the four years of aging had mellowed the taste to perfection. A new "deliciously different" flavor had been created, and Vernor's Ginger Ale was born. From a small drugstore in Detroit to a product enjoyed across America and Canada, Vernor's is a success story. Vernor's is the story of a small back-room product turned into a highly successful brand. Vernor's Ginger Ale takes readers on a journey from pharmacy to factory, from entrepreneur to franchised corporation.
Michigan Roots	 - Vernor's Ginger Ale
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Detroit is famous for its cars and its music. From the 1950s through the 1970s, Motor City fans experienced a golden age of rock and roll. Rock was the defiant voice of the boomer generation. The 1960s and the 1970s were turbulent decades. Blacks and women asserted themselves, breaking down the establishment. Rock music, and the spirit and events that defined it, advanced these interests. The war in Vietnam brought tension and national conflict. Drugs and a sexual revolution, made possible by the introduction of the birth control pill, added to the volatile mix. Woodstock, May Day protests, and the resignation of Pres. Richard Nixon were just a few of the upheavals that made these decades two of the most important in the nation's history. Motor City Rock and Roll: The 1960s and 1970s features 200 images, capturing local musicians who started in Detroit and then traveled the world, as well as world-famous acts who came to the city to perform. Intimate stories of musicians, bands, and other members of the rock community make this history a must for dedicated fans.
Michigan Roots	 - Motor City Rock and Roll: The 1960s and 1970s
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Beginning as a group of delinquents committing petty crimes, they became Detroit's infamous Purple Gang, of one of the most notorious organized crime groups of the 20th century. The photographs in this fascinating collection chronologically follow the evolution of the Purples from their days as a juvenile street gang through their rise to power and eventual self-destruction. Detroit had a gold rush atmosphere and a thriving black market during the 1920s that attracted gangsters and unsavory characters from all over the country. The gang's reputation for hijacking and terror spread far, and they became associates with Al Capone, their location a perfect midway point to smuggle Canadian whisky across the border and down into Chicago. Their reputation was such that they were even suspected by the FBI for being involved with the Lindbergh baby kidnapping. Using rare police department mug shots and group photographs, the book transports readers through the dark side of Prohibition-era Detroit history.
Michigan Roots - Detroit's Infamous Purple Gang
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Detroit has always been at the forefront of American popular music development, and the ragtime years and jazz age are no exception. The city's long history of diversity has served the region well, providing a fertile environment for creating and nurturing some of America's most distinctly indigenous music. With a focus on the people and places that made Detroit a major contributor to America's rich musical heritage, Detroit: Ragtime and the Jazz Age provides a unique photo journal of a period stretching from the Civil War to the diminishing years of the big bands in the early 1940s.
Michigan Roots	 - Detroit: Ragtime and the Jazz Age
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At the height of America's Arts and Crafts movement, Detroit neighbors Horace J. Caulkins and Mary Chase Perry pooled their talents together to found Pewabic Pottery. With modest beginnings in 1903, Pewabic transformed from a rented stable in Brush Park to an English Tudor building on East Jefferson Avenue, where it has operated since 1907. Today, the iconic enterprise continues Perry's dedication to handcrafted ceramics and remains known for its iridescent glaze on everything from vessels and architectural tiles to ecclesiastical installations in churches across the country, including the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception. Author Cara Catallo illuminates the story behind one of the oldest American handcrafted pottery traditions.
Michigan Roots	 - Pewabic Pottery: A History Handcrafted in Detroit
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Detroit's crowning jewel, Belle Isle, has been a leisure destination for natives and visitors alike for well over a century. Originating as Wahnabezee or "Swan Island" by Native Americans and Isle aux Cochons or "Hog Island" by early French settlers, the name was changed to Belle Isle in 1845 to honor Michigan governor Lewis Cass's daughter Isabelle. After generations of passing between public and private ownership, the island was bought in 1879 by the City of Detroit, which commissioned famed landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted to create the beloved haven that is known today. An island oasis with attractions dating back to its early years, Belle Isle continues to connect the past, present, and future of a vibrant city.
Michigan Roots	 - Belle Isle
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Competing with the likes of Detroit and Ann Arbor, Jackson won the battle to build Michigan's first state prison in 1838. During the era of the "Big House" and industrial growth, the penitentiary's on-site factories and cheap inmate labor helped Jackson become a thriving manufacturing city. In contrast to Jacktown's beautiful Greco-Roman exterior, medieval punishments, a strict code of silence, no heat, no electricity and a lack of plumbing defined life on the inside. Author Judy Gail Krasnow shares the incredible stories of life at Jacktown, replete with sadistic wardens, crafty escapees, Prohibition's Purple Gang, a chaplain who ran a brothel and influential reformers.
Michigan Roots - Jacktown: History & Hard Times at Michigan's First State Prison
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In a reconfigured farmhouse just a mile outside of the city limits of Detroit, a Jesuit priest and 25 men, women, and children gathered to celebrate Sunday mass on March 19, 1922. The Reverend John McNichols named the Catholic mission church Gesu, the Italian word for "Jesus." Gesu became one of Detroit's landmark parishes. Its history illustrates the Motor City's boom, bust, resilience, and resurgence. It was the home parish of four Detroit mayors, powerful members of Congress, auto industry titans, sports legends, artists, authors, and actors. At its peak in the mid-1960s, Gesu School enrolled 1,600 students. Because of Detroit's decline and its racial and economic struggles, Gesu is one of only four Catholic elementary schools that remain in the city. But as Detroit rebounds, Gesu School is growing again.
Michigan Roots	 - Detroit Gesu Catholic Church and School
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Michigan's beautiful Upper Peninsula plays host to some of the state's most spine-tingling ghost stories. At Old Victoria, a ghostly apparition continues to rock in her favorite chair. Visitors can still hear the screams of miners trapped and killed in the wreckage of the Mansfield Mine disaster. Trampled to death over false claims of fire, the victims of the Italian Hall Disaster linger on in Calumet. And Mackinac is home to more than one hundred ghosts, making the island one of the state's most haunted places. Local author Jennifer Billock recounts the chilling tales of the UP's spectral heritage.
Michigan Roots	 - Ghosts of Michigan's Upper Peninsula
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With vivid battlefield accounts based on extensive primary research, award-winning author Jack Dempsey’s masterful biography tells the amazing story of an unsung hero. Detroit’s Alpheus Starkey Williams never tired in service to his city or his country. A veteran of the Mexican-American War, he was a preeminent military figure in Michigan before the Civil War. He was key to the Lost Order, the Battle of Gettysburg, the March to the Sea and the Carolinas Campaign. His generalship at Antietam made possible the Emancipation Proclamation, and Meade and Sherman relied on his unshakable leadership. A steady hand in wartime and in peacetime, Williams was a Yale graduate, lawyer, judge, editor, municipal official, militia officer, diplomat and congressman who stood on principle over party.
Michigan Roots	 - Michigan's Civil War Citizen-General: Alpheus S. Williams
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Whenever there was a knock at the Capuchin Monastery door, Fr. Solanus Casey answered. The Capuchin friar's prayers brought comfort and healing to visitors he greeted at friaries in Michigan, New York, and Indiana. On September 12, 2012, inside St. Bonaventure Monastery in Detroit, where Casey's remains are interred, a miracle happened. Minutes after a pilgrim knelt at Casey's tomb, signs of her lifelong genetic skin disease disappeared. Pope Francis declared the healing a miracle, and nearly 70,000 people filled a Detroit football stadium on November 18, 2017, for Casey's beatification ceremony, when the Catholic Church honored him with the title of "Blessed." The Wisconsin-born Casey, a onetime prison guard who died in 1957 at the age of 86, is now one step and one more miracle away from becoming a saint. The photographs in Blessed Solanus Casey illustrate the arc of his life and legacy, including images from his early years and ministry to the poor, of those who say they have been healed by his prayers, and of the stirring Catholic rituals accompanying the friar's path to possible sainthood.
Michigan Roots	 - Blessed Solanus Casey
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Across Detroit, fleeting symbols of the past hide in plain sight, behind weeds and under veneers of paint. Demolishing a vacant building among empty storefronts on the west side uncovered the telltale gold and green of a Vernors Ginger Ale sign, preserved almost as vibrantly as the artist intended. In faded red, white and blue, Mac-O-Lac Paint makes an expired pitch to passersby on Gratiot near Eastern Market. On the east side, Mohawk Rock and Rye still declares itself the "World's Finest!" Carhartt, Stroh's and Faygo appear in odd, deserted places. Detroit Free Press journalist Robert Allen sifts through these advertising fossils, exposing the gripping stories connected to the Motor City's historic rises, falls and eccentricities.
Michigan Roots - Fading Ads of Detroit
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Leslie Pielack tells the story of those whose lives intertwined with the Saginaw Trail, the ancient path that transformed early Michigan. The Saginaw Trail led from the frontier town of Detroit into the wilderness, weaving through towering trees and swamps to distant Native American villages. Presenting a forbidding landscape that was also a settlers' paradise, the road promised great riches in natural resources like lumber and agriculture, and a future of wheeled vehicles that would make Michigan the center of a global industry.
Michigan Roots - The Saginaw Trail: From Native American Path to Woodward Avenue
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Few cities have seen the rise and fall that Detroit has. At its height, it was the fourth largest city in the U.S. with 1.85 million residents. Today there are less than 700,000. In 2013, the city declared bankruptcy, making it the largest municipal bankruptcy in history. There are an estimated 70,000 abandoned buildings, 31,000 empty homes, and 90,000 vacant lots in the Motor City. This is where Abandoned Detroit picks up the story. What became of these forgotten buildings? Have you ever wondered what lies within that old building as you drive past? Join us as we step foot inside these haunting and beautiful locations including: factories, schools, nursing homes, zoos, hospitals, houses, and many more. Featuring over 200 full-color photographs, you will witness the beauty that can be found in decay as we look at these buildings, many for the last time before they are lost forever to time or the wrecking ball. Abandoned Detroit not only takes you inside these lost places but tells the history of them and how they came to be abandoned.
Michigan Roots	 - Abandoned Detroit
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The Detroit Tigers came out of the womb scratching and snarling. Early owner James D. Burns orchestrated the only known arrest of a journalist while covering a game. It's the only Major League franchise to sign a star player out of prison, which happened twice. Ex-Tigers have done time for crimes ranging from armed robbery to racketeering-and worse. One tried to burn and dismember a group of men after they kidnapped his mother. Another threatened to blow up a cruise ship unless he was paid a sizeable ransom. And Detroit legend Ty Cobb ran afoul of the law several times during his brilliant, tumultuous and often mischaracterized career. Join Detroit News writer George Hunter on a foray into the darkest, unruliest and sometimes funniest moments in Tigers history.
Michigan Roots	 - Detroit Tigers Gone Wild: Mischief, Crimes and Hard Time
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More than 3,000 Kalamazoo County men served in the Union forces during the Civil War. They fought in the most horrific battles from Blackburn’s Ford to Appomattox, and 396 did not return home. The war tested the area not just on the battlefield but in its collective back yard and, at times, its front yard. A “peace rally” held by local Democrats was interrupted by Lincoln supporters who viewed the Democrats as traitors. Residents reacted jubilantly to the capture of Richmond, the Confederate capital, and mourned the assassination of Lincoln, who had visited the village of Kalamazoo before the war. As veterans, the former combatants left behind indelible reminders of their sacrifice. Local historian Gary L. Gibson uncovers long-lost stories, many never before told, of Kalamazoo County during and after America’s bloodiest conflict.
Michigan Roots	 - Kalamazoo County and the Civil War
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The name “Manistee” comes from the Ojibwa who lived in the region. Some believe it means “Spirit of the Woods”—and that seems fitting. The abundance of towering white pine trees attracted John Stronach to build the first sawmill in the area in 1841. A thriving lumber town rose up along the river. A fire destroyed much of the town in 1871, and wealthy lumber barons decided to rebuild the town out of brick; those structures still line River Street today. The Manistee streets are quieter now than they were in the town’s heyday, but the Victorian charm and over a century of remarkable history remain.
Michigan Roots	 - Manistee County
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A Michigan icon, Grand Hotel is in its third century as “America’s summer place.” The ambiance of Mackinac Island combines with the hotel’s ultimate level of hospitality, premier dining, and five-star guest experience for an unforgettable stop on any visitor’s itinerary. The setting itself has been captured by Hollywood on film, relied upon by politicians and the business community for conferences, and explored by those seeking relaxation and top-notch amenities for everything from weddings to family vacations. Three generations of one family have cared for Grand Hotel for more than 85 years, inspecting each room before opening, planning constant off-season improvements, and greeting everyday guests with the same welcoming smiles and handshakes that presidents receive. Grand Hotel has been named a national historic landmark and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.
Michigan Roots - Mackinac Island's Grand Hotel
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Even in law-abiding southwestern Michigan, the Eighteenth Amendment turned ordinary citizens into scofflaws and sparked unprecedented unrest. Betta Holloway reached her breaking point when her husband, a Portland cop, was shot pursuing a rumrunner. She relieved his pain with a neighbor’s homebrew. As farmers across the region fermented their fruit to make a living, gangsters like Al Capone amassed extraordinary wealth. Baby Face Nelson came to Grand Haven and proved that he had no aptitude for robbing banks. Even before the Volstead Act passed, Battle Creek bad guy Adam “Pump” Arnold routinely broke all local prohibition laws—and every other law as well. Meanwhile, Carrie Nation hectored Michigan with her “hatchetations.” Authors Norma Lewis and Christine Nyholm reveal how the Noble Experiment fueled a rowdy, roaring, decade-long party.
Michigan Roots	 - Prohibition in Southwestern Michigan
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Since 1845, along the River Raisin in the southeastern Michigan town of Monroe, the Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary (IHM) have distinguished themselves as educators, activists, and Catholic pioneers. At the congregation’s peak, the motherhouse dispatched nearly 1,600 nuns to more than 100 schools across metropolitan Detroit and several states. For 175 years, the sisters taught the three Rs and the meaning of faith to nearly 700,000 students and established important metro Detroit institutions such as Marygrove College, Immaculata and Marian High Schools, and St. Mary Academy. Widely known by their initials, the IHMs have extended their reach worldwide. Monroe IHM members have served in key roles at the Vatican, as leaders of organizations representing Catholic sisters in the United States, as missionaries in Third World countries, and as groundbreaking activists and theologians. The Monroe IHMs today also attract lay women and men who dedicate themselves to the congregation’s values and goals by becoming IHM Associates.
Michigan Roots	 - Immaculate Heart of Mary Sisters of Michigan
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Dan Austin, author of Lost Detroit and creator of HistoricDetroit.org, recaptures stories and memories of a forgotten Detroit, giving readers a glimpse into some of the most stunning buildings this city has ever known. Lovingly referred to as the Motor City, Detroit put the world on wheels. Once the fourth largest city in the country, Detroit's streets were filled with bustling crowds and lined with breathtaking landmarks. Over the years, many of the city's most beautiful buildings--packed with marble, ornate metalwork, painted ceilings and glitz and glamour--have been reduced to dust. From the hallowed halls of Old City Hall to the floating majesty of steamships to the birthplace of the automotive industry, join the author on a tour of Detroit's most important landmarks that have been left to gather dust.
Michigan Roots	 - Forgotten Landmarks of Detroit
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Michigan’s Upper Peninsula is a veritable cornucopia of delicious dishes. Over the centuries, the shared food knowledge and passion of Native Americans and immigrants of all kinds produced the region’s iconic foods and beloved restaurants. Mackinac Island remains the epicenter for fine food. Here one can dine on freshly caught trout and whitefish at the Grand Hotel before tracking down the island’s celebrated fudge for dessert. Afield of the island, visitors and residents alike can attend a Friday night fish fry virtually anywhere in the area, savor a juicy “Big C” burger at one of the many Clyde’s Drive-In locations or just have a refreshing glass of beer at Tahquamenon Brew Pub in aptly named Paradise. Author and award-winning historian Russell M. Magnaghi delves into the delectable food history of the Upper Peninsula.
Michigan Roots - Classic Food and Restaurants of the Upper Peninsula
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Learn the story behind one of Detroit's most infamous mobs with rare photographs documenting their rise and fall. Motor City Mafia: A Century of Organized Crime in Detroit chronicles the storied and hallowed gangland history of the notorious Detroit underworld. Scott M. Burnstein takes the reader inside the belly of the beast, tracking the bloodshed, exploits, and leadership of the southeast Michigan crime syndicate as never before seen in print. Through a stunning array of rare archival photographs and images, Motor City Mafia captures Detroit's most infamous past, from its inception in the early part of the 20th century, through the years when the iconic Purple Gang ruled the city's streets during Prohibition, through the 1930s and the formation of the local Italian mafia, and the Detroit crime family's glory days in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s, all the way to the downfall of the area's mob reign in the 1980s and 1990s.
Michigan Roots	 - Motor City Mafia: A Century of Organized Crime in Detroit
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Farmington, one of Detroit's oldest suburbs, was originally inhabited by the Potawatomi and was ceded to the government for sale to settlers beginning in 1820. Established as Quakertown and incorporated as Farmington, this "Crossroads Community" developed around a literal railroad stop, flourishing from an agricultural center to a thriving business district. A sense of community, family, and home inspired residents to overcome natural and social obstacles to carve a substantial and influential niche in the Michigan landscape.
Michigan Roots - Farmington and Farmington Hills
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For more than 130 years, there has been no sweeter word in Detroit than Sanders. The venerable confectioner was once as much a part of Detroit's streetscape as the Big Three, Hudson's, and Coney Islands. Sanders was more than just an ice-cream and candy shop. A Detroit icon, it served a fountain of memories for generations. Detroiters stood two and three deep behind lunch counters for tuna or egg salad sandwiches, devil's food buttercream "bumpy"cake, hot fudge sundaes, and Sanders' signature dessert—hot fudge cream puffs. As Detroit boomed, so did Sanders. At its peak, the company boasted more than 50 stores, with its products available in as many as 200 supermarkets. The Sanders story began in Chicago, where Fred Sanders opened his first shop. A series of misfortunes prompted him to relocate to Detroit, where he began selling his confections on Woodward Avenue. Business grew steadily, and by the early 1900s, he had opened other shops along Woodward and elsewhere in Detroit. The Motor City nearly lost Sanders in the mid-1980s, but its desserts shops have begun resurfacing, thanks to another Detroit institution, Morley Brands LLC, which bought the Sanders brand.
Michigan Roots - Sanders Confectionery
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Located on the banks of the Rouge River just ten miles from Detroit, the city of Dearborn began as a humble pioneer settlement in the 1780s. Over the course of two centuries, it has developed into a close-knit community, a college town, a major tourism center, and a world-famous industrial city. Through an impressive collection of photographs drawn from the Dearborn Historical Museum, Images of America: Dearborn, Michigan documents the influential people, places, and events that have shaped Dearborn's rich history. This book traces Dearborn's spirit of innovation through engaging glimpses of the 19th century U.S. Arsenal, the historic River Rouge Plant, Mayor Hubbard's lasting influence, and the legacy of Henry Ford. From the European settlers who first settled on the banks of the Rouge, to the streets, buildings, and schools that were named for them, Dearborn is revealed as a vibrant urban community with a strong sense of civic pride.
Michigan Roots - Dearborn, Michigan
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Author Tobin T. Buhk recounts the thrilling tales of Detroit's most violent, clever and misunderstood female criminals. "Queen of the Underworld" Sophie Lyons faced off with detective Teresa Lewis in court three times, and twice in the street, rendering both women battered and bloodied. Nellie Pope goaded her lover to axe her husband in what the press called "one of the most atrocious, cold-blooded, and deliberately-planned murders" in city history. Mother Elinor L. Mason, "High Priestess of the Flying Roller Colony," was no holy roller but a criminal chameleon who changed personas as easily as some people change clothes. And a feud between Delray madams Julia Toth and Annie Smith exposed widespread graft in the thriving red-light industry and led to one of the worst police scandals in Motor City history. These stories and more await in this deliciously entertaining collection.
Michigan Roots - Wicked Women of Detroit
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Mexican immigrants began to settle in Detroit at the beginning of the 20th century. They were attracted by the jobs available in the automobile industry and the rest of the rapidly expanding industrial base. Like other immigrant ethnic groups, Mexicans came to Detroit intent on providing a better life, and future, for their families. They opened businesses like specialty grocery and retail stores, barbershops, and restaurants. They bought homes, educated their children, served in all branches of the military, and became model Americans. What they brought to Detroit were family values, faith, and a strong work ethic. Detroit's Mexicantown offers a glimpse into when and where the community started.
Michigan Roots - Detroit's Mexicantown
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Abandoned Detroit: Vacant Schools provides an in-depth look into Detroit’s most infamous crumbling schools and decaying educational infrastructure. A city that was once bustling with life with full neighborhoods now sits in disrepair. Schools with beautifully decorated hallways and packed classrooms are now left vacant and forgotten, and chalkboards are still etched with lessons that will never be taught again. Students’ creative art projects sit idle, collecting dust, never to receive their final grade. Brilliant photos reveal tales left behind and uncover the history of the rise and fall of Detroit’s educational boom. Readers will see the Motor City in a way that is seldom seen. Abandoned Detroit has history that is uncovered and showcased by stunning images from urban photographer Tony Vienneau. The history of these schools will never be forgotten and there are always lessons to be learned within their walls.
Michigan Roots - Abandoned Detroit: Vacant Schools
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