It's fitting that this wrecking crew have named their third full-length, Chimaira. That's because this Cleveland sextet have fine tuned and honed their style so deftly, that this album truly represents everything they were, everything they are, and everything they will be once this monster is unleashed.
It's fitting that this wrecking crew have named their third full-length, Chimaira. That's because this Cleveland sextet have fine tuned and honed their style so deftly, that this album truly represents everything they were, everything they are, and everything they will be once this monster is unleashed.
016861826222
Chimaira
Artist: Chimaira
Format: CD
New: OUT OF STOCK. Contact us for availability.
Wish

Available Formats and Editions

More Info:

It's fitting that this wrecking crew have named their third full-length, Chimaira. That's because this Cleveland sextet have fine tuned and honed their style so deftly, that this album truly represents everything they were, everything they are, and everything they will be once this monster is unleashed.

Reviews:

The debate surrounding this Cleveland band regards whether or not they're n"u-metal. Of course, to staunch metalheads, stupid crap like categorization is sometimes as important as whether or not the music's any good. Then again, considering n"u-metal's unofficial status as a "black hole of quality," this debate may be more important than we realize.

I'm here today to tell you to ignore vocalist Mark Hunter's dreadlocks, the wallet chains, the permanent keyboard/electronics dude , and the fact that they've signed their lives away to Roadrunner, because Chimaira aren't n"u-metal; they're metal and boy-howdy, some of it's pretty good! Ex-Misery Index and Dying Fetus man Kevin Talley is behind the kit now, which ups their cred. If that doesn't do it for you, Rob Arnold's scalding leads should. Still not convinced? Add nasally vocals to leadoff track "Nothing Remains" and try to picture it not being on the last Exodus album. "Save Ourselves" and "Inside the Horror" sound how Sepultura should these days. And don't worry about keyboard/electronics man Chris Spicuzza-he's all about adding industrial-ish noise textures and screechin' 'n' scrapin' to the barrage.

The downside is that Chimaira have thrown songwriting economy out the window-as the tunes average between five and seven minutes, without five to seven minutes of material consistently filling those spaces. Things get repetitive before the midpoint and, if you make it to seven-plus minute closer "Lazarus," downright boring.