Dearborn Music

"I was in a perfectly blissful mood. I have seldom written music with such delight." Thus Brahms, notorious curmudgeon, to his friend Joseph Joachim, while engaged in his standard practice of arranging larger works - in this case the Second Serenade - for domestic consumption in the form of piano duet. In those days such arrangements were the means by which most people could appreciate the music of Brahms and indeed anyone else, but now that we have an embarrassment of riches from which to choose, it is still worth gazing back into time a little and alighting on these 60s East German recordings of the composer's two early attempts both to avoid and embrace symphonic scale composition in the company of the still under-rated Heinz Bongartz. As his legendary Leipzig recording of Bruckner's Sixth ably demonstrates, Bongartz never let the grandeur of the Austro-German tradition get in the way of making the music sing. Born in 1894, he overlapped Brahms by four years, and the sense of a heritage tells in these still-vivid recordings made with the orchestra of which he was the founding music director. In 1992 Gramophone remarked of Gunter Herbig that he is a "wise and experienced" Brahmsian, virtues appreciable in these Berlin recordings of works which, like the Serenades, show the composer's sunny side, even if clouds are never far away.
"I was in a perfectly blissful mood. I have seldom written music with such delight." Thus Brahms, notorious curmudgeon, to his friend Joseph Joachim, while engaged in his standard practice of arranging larger works - in this case the Second Serenade - for domestic consumption in the form of piano duet. In those days such arrangements were the means by which most people could appreciate the music of Brahms and indeed anyone else, but now that we have an embarrassment of riches from which to choose, it is still worth gazing back into time a little and alighting on these 60s East German recordings of the composer's two early attempts both to avoid and embrace symphonic scale composition in the company of the still under-rated Heinz Bongartz. As his legendary Leipzig recording of Bruckner's Sixth ably demonstrates, Bongartz never let the grandeur of the Austro-German tradition get in the way of making the music sing. Born in 1894, he overlapped Brahms by four years, and the sense of a heritage tells in these still-vivid recordings made with the orchestra of which he was the founding music director. In 1992 Gramophone remarked of Gunter Herbig that he is a "wise and experienced" Brahmsian, virtues appreciable in these Berlin recordings of works which, like the Serenades, show the composer's sunny side, even if clouds are never far away.
5028421950730
Dresdner Philharmonie - Serenades 1 & 2 - Overtures - Haydn Variations

Details

Format: CD
Label: BRLT
Rel. Date: 05/26/2015
UPC: 5028421950730

Serenades 1 & 2 - Overtures - Haydn Variations
Artist: Dresdner Philharmonie
Format: CD
New: Available In Store $8.92
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Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. Serenade No. 1 In D Major, Op. 11: I. Allegro Molto
2. Serenade No. 1 In D Major, Op. 11: II. Scherzo. Allegro Non Troppo
3. Serenade No. 1 In D Major, Op. 11: III. Adagio Non Troppo
4. Serenade No. 1 In D Major, Op. 11: IV. Menuetto I & II
5. Serenade No. 1 In D Major, Op. 11: V. Scherzo. Allegro
6. Serenade No. 1 In D Major, Op. 11: VI. Rondo. Allegro
7. Academic Festival Overture In C Minor, Op. 80
8. Tragic Overture In D Minor, Op. 81
9. Variations On A Theme By Haydn In B-Flat Major, Op. 56a: Theme. Andante
10. Variations On A Theme By Haydn In B-Flat Major, Op. 56a: Variation I. Poco Più Animato
11. Variations On A Theme By Haydn In B-Flat Major, Op. 56a: Variation II. Più Vivace
12. Variations On A Theme By Haydn In B-Flat Major, Op. 56a: Variation III. Con Moto
13. Variations On A Theme By Haydn In B-Flat Major, Op. 56a: Variation IV. Andante Con Moto
14. Variations On A Theme By Haydn In B-Flat Major, Op. 56a: Variation V. Vivace
15. Variations On A Theme By Haydn In B-Flat Major, Op. 56a: Variation VI. Vivace
16. Variations On A Theme By Haydn In B-Flat Major, Op. 56a: Variation VII. Grazioso
17. Variations On A Theme By Haydn In B-Flat Major, Op. 56a: Variation VIII. Presto Non Troppo
18. Variations On A Theme By Haydn In B-Flat Major, Op. 56a: Finale. Andante
19. Serenade No. 2 In A Major, Op. 16: I. Allegro Moderato
20. Serenade No. 2 In A Major, Op. 16: II. Scherzo. Vivace
21. Serenade No. 2 In A Major, Op. 16: III. Adagio Non Troppo
22. Serenade No. 2 In A Major, Op. 16: IV. Quasi Menuetto
23. Serenade No. 2 In A Major, Op. 16: V. Rondo. Allegro

More Info:

"I was in a perfectly blissful mood. I have seldom written music with such delight." Thus Brahms, notorious curmudgeon, to his friend Joseph Joachim, while engaged in his standard practice of arranging larger works - in this case the Second Serenade - for domestic consumption in the form of piano duet. In those days such arrangements were the means by which most people could appreciate the music of Brahms and indeed anyone else, but now that we have an embarrassment of riches from which to choose, it is still worth gazing back into time a little and alighting on these 60s East German recordings of the composer's two early attempts both to avoid and embrace symphonic scale composition in the company of the still under-rated Heinz Bongartz. As his legendary Leipzig recording of Bruckner's Sixth ably demonstrates, Bongartz never let the grandeur of the Austro-German tradition get in the way of making the music sing. Born in 1894, he overlapped Brahms by four years, and the sense of a heritage tells in these still-vivid recordings made with the orchestra of which he was the founding music director. In 1992 Gramophone remarked of Gunter Herbig that he is a "wise and experienced" Brahmsian, virtues appreciable in these Berlin recordings of works which, like the Serenades, show the composer's sunny side, even if clouds are never far away.
        
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