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Thomas 'Fats' Waller was born in New York in 1904. His musical talents were obvious early - as was his charm - aged six, Fats talked his way into unlimited access to a neighbor's piano. His older brother Bob persuaded the family to buy their own instrument. Fats was sent to lessons, but soon dropped out - he could learn a tune simply by watching his teacher play it. It was at school that Fats first sensed the fun of playing to an audience. He found that he could easily work a crowd into a frenzy of stamping and clapping with a combination of humorous asides, knowing winks and artistry. By Fats' fourteenth birthday it was obvious that his destiny lay in music. He quit school so that he could get a job to finance piano lessons. Before long, he gravitated to a food delivery company that specialised in the discreet supply of booze. This gave him an entree into Harlem's clubs, where he was able to watch piano idols like James P Johnson. Fats inveigled himself into the Lincoln movie theatre. He sat in for both the pianist who accompanied the movies and the intermission organist. When the organist fell sick, Fats - then 15 - stepped in. Soon after, he was offered the job permanently. In 1920 Fats met James P Johnson who recognised the young man's talent. Johnson coached Fats, introduced him to the jazz fraternity and got him gigs. By the time the first two tracks here were cut, Fats had married. The producer on the session had brought the sheet music for Muscle Shoals Blues to the studio - so this might have been the first time Fats had seen it. Already the mature artist is on display. Fats was asked to improvise a B-side. Birmingham Blues was the result. Not a bad morning's work. Thus started a career in entertainment, which almost never faltered. Fats himself was in a continuous state of forward motion, his energy undimmed until shortly before the end. But that's the future. In the meantime we have a heap of supremely entertaining music to enjoy.
Thomas 'Fats' Waller was born in New York in 1904. His musical talents were obvious early - as was his charm - aged six, Fats talked his way into unlimited access to a neighbor's piano. His older brother Bob persuaded the family to buy their own instrument. Fats was sent to lessons, but soon dropped out - he could learn a tune simply by watching his teacher play it. It was at school that Fats first sensed the fun of playing to an audience. He found that he could easily work a crowd into a frenzy of stamping and clapping with a combination of humorous asides, knowing winks and artistry. By Fats' fourteenth birthday it was obvious that his destiny lay in music. He quit school so that he could get a job to finance piano lessons. Before long, he gravitated to a food delivery company that specialised in the discreet supply of booze. This gave him an entree into Harlem's clubs, where he was able to watch piano idols like James P Johnson. Fats inveigled himself into the Lincoln movie theatre. He sat in for both the pianist who accompanied the movies and the intermission organist. When the organist fell sick, Fats - then 15 - stepped in. Soon after, he was offered the job permanently. In 1920 Fats met James P Johnson who recognised the young man's talent. Johnson coached Fats, introduced him to the jazz fraternity and got him gigs. By the time the first two tracks here were cut, Fats had married. The producer on the session had brought the sheet music for Muscle Shoals Blues to the studio - so this might have been the first time Fats had seen it. Already the mature artist is on display. Fats was asked to improvise a B-side. Birmingham Blues was the result. Not a bad morning's work. Thus started a career in entertainment, which almost never faltered. Fats himself was in a continuous state of forward motion, his energy undimmed until shortly before the end. But that's the future. In the meantime we have a heap of supremely entertaining music to enjoy.
788065902728

Details

Format: CD
Label: JSP
Catalog: 927
Rel. Date: 06/05/2007
UPC: 788065902728

Complete Recorded Works, Vol. 1
Artist: Fats Waller
Format: CD
New: Available In Store $27.99
Wish

Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. Muscle Shoals Blues
2. Birmingham Blues
3. 'Taint Nobody's Bus'ness If I Do
4. You Got Ev'rything a Sweet Mama Needs But Me
5. Mama's Got the Blues
6. Last Go Round Blues
7. Stingaree Blues
8. You Can't Do What My Last Man Did
9. Sister Kate
10. You Can't Do What My Last Man Did
11. Trixie Blues
12. I'm Cert'ny Gonna See 'Bout That
13. Squabbling Blues
14. In Harlem's Araby
15. You Don't Know My Mind Blues
16. West Indies Blues
17. Maybe Someday
18. (I'm Gonna See You) When Your Troubles Are Just Like Mine
19. You Get Mad
20. What's the Matter Now?
21. Nobody Knows de Trouble I See
22. Couldn't Hear Nobody Pray
23. Ain't Got Nobody to Grind Ma Coffee
24. Mama's Losin' a Mighty Good Chance
25. Henderson Stomp, The
26. Chant, The

DISC: 2

1. St Louis Blues
2. Lenox Avenue Blues
3. What Do You Know About That
4. Shut Your Mouth
5. Soothin' Syrup Stomp
6. Sloppy Water Blues
7. Loveless Love
8. Messin' Around with the Blues
9. Rusty Pail, The
10. Stompin' the Bug
11. Hog-Maw Stomp
12. Blue Black Bottom Stomp
13. Whiteman Stomp
14. I'm Coming Virginia
15. Preach the Word
16. I'll Just Stand and Ring My Hands and Cry
17. True Friendship
18. Christians' Trouble Is Ended, The
19. Sugar
20. Sugar
21. Beale Street Blues
22. Beale Street Blues
23. I'm Going to See My Ma
24. "Fats" Waller Stomp
25. Savannah Blues

DISC: 3

1. Won't You Take Me Home
2. My Old Daddy's Got a Brand New Way to Love
3. Anything That Happens Just Pleases Me
4. I've Got the Joogie Blues
5. Florence
6. Gone But Not Forgotten
7. You Live on in Memory
8. Bye-Bye Florence
9. He's Gone Away
10. I Ain't Got Nobody
11. Digah's Stomp, The
12. Red Hot Dan
13. Geechee
14. Please Take Me out of Jail
15. Back in Your Own Back Yard
16. Nobody Knows How Much I Love You
17. What's the Use of Being Alone?
18. Original Blues
19. Willow Tree
20. 'Sippi
21. Thou Swell
22. Persian Rug
23. Chicago Blues - (take)
24. Mournful Tho'ts

DISC: 4

1. You Can't Do What My Last Man Did
2. Trixie Blues
3. St Louis Blues
4. What Do You Know About That
5. Shut Your Mouth
6. Soothin' Syrup Stomp
7. Sloppy Water
8. Messin' Around with the Blues
9. Rusty Pail, The
10. Stompin' the Bug
11. Hog-Maw Stomp
12. "Fats" Waller Stomp
13. Savannah Blues
14. Won't You Take Me Home
15. My Old Daddy's Got a Brand New Way to Love
16. Anything That Happens Just Pleases Me
17. I've Got the Joogie Blues
18. He's Gone Away
19. Digah's Stomp, The
20. Red Hot Dan
21. Geechee
22. Please Take Me out of Jail
23. Willow Tree
24. 'Sippi
25. Thou Swell

More Info:

Thomas 'Fats' Waller was born in New York in 1904. His musical talents were obvious early - as was his charm - aged six, Fats talked his way into unlimited access to a neighbor's piano. His older brother Bob persuaded the family to buy their own instrument. Fats was sent to lessons, but soon dropped out - he could learn a tune simply by watching his teacher play it. It was at school that Fats first sensed the fun of playing to an audience. He found that he could easily work a crowd into a frenzy of stamping and clapping with a combination of humorous asides, knowing winks and artistry. By Fats' fourteenth birthday it was obvious that his destiny lay in music. He quit school so that he could get a job to finance piano lessons. Before long, he gravitated to a food delivery company that specialised in the discreet supply of booze. This gave him an entree into Harlem's clubs, where he was able to watch piano idols like James P Johnson. Fats inveigled himself into the Lincoln movie theatre. He sat in for both the pianist who accompanied the movies and the intermission organist. When the organist fell sick, Fats - then 15 - stepped in. Soon after, he was offered the job permanently. In 1920 Fats met James P Johnson who recognised the young man's talent. Johnson coached Fats, introduced him to the jazz fraternity and got him gigs. By the time the first two tracks here were cut, Fats had married. The producer on the session had brought the sheet music for Muscle Shoals Blues to the studio - so this might have been the first time Fats had seen it. Already the mature artist is on display. Fats was asked to improvise a B-side. Birmingham Blues was the result. Not a bad morning's work. Thus started a career in entertainment, which almost never faltered. Fats himself was in a continuous state of forward motion, his energy undimmed until shortly before the end. But that's the future. In the meantime we have a heap of supremely entertaining music to enjoy.
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